A message to our donors

More than ever, we are grateful for your continued support of Humanities Nebraska and of each other.

These are extraordinary times, and the strength and devotion of Nebraskans gives us confidence that our mission will remain strong now and for the future. We anticipate a delay in acknowledging donations but please know, every effort will be made to acknowledge your donation in a timely fashion. If you have any questions, please contact Heather Thomas, Director of Development. Thank you.

Donation Levels:

Patron’s Circle: $1,000
Gold Sower: $ 500
Silver Sower: $250

Sower: $ 100
Friend: $   50

Thank you for your gift on our secure website!

Your gift makes a positive impact on people in Nebraska.

Joaquin* didn’t like school and never read on his own. Now that he attends Prime Time Family Reading Time, he is interested in books. His grades have improved, and his mother has confidence he will graduate from high school when he is older.  

*Not his real name

A U.S. military veteran, Patricia* had not dealt with her post-traumatic stress disorder until participating in Nebraska Warrior Writers. Being able to write stories and poems helped her find ways to express her thoughts and feelings in a way she had never been able to do before. 

 

*Not her real name

Julia learned to explore different perspectives on global policies at Capitol Forum on America’s Future. She is now a senator representing her home district at the Nebraska Unicameral. 

Daniel* found the courage to speak out about injustice when a published poet mentored his school’s Louder Than a Bomb slam poetry team. Mentoring poets are funded through a grant provided by Humanities Nebraska.

*Not his real name

Valerie found that hosting a Museum on Main Street exhibit from the Smithsonian  increased the total number of visitors to the museum she manages by 20%. That number included a boost in out-of-town visitors who ate and shopped locally, giving her community a measurable economic boost.

Everything Anthony* knew about the history of civil rights were limited to books until he attended Nebraska Chautauqua. Listening to scholars present first-person accounts of what different historic figures experienced helped Anthony make a connection to those who have had to fight for equality. “I learned much about the civil right movement that I didn’t know,” he said. 

*Not his real name

Isolated from friends and family during the pandemic, Ellen participated in Dear Stranger, HN’s letter exchange program. Ellen’s letter was sent to a participant who lives in different part of the state, with differing experiences and perspectives. Now the two exchange letters regularly.