(5) Poetry Subjects

abuse is not LOVE

by Felicia Webster

abuse is not LOVE, is a spoken word play with the creative highlights and energy of Dani Cleveland, Doriette Jordan, Paula Bell and Felicia Webster. This highly charged 40 minute play uses interactive dialogue, gospel, hip hop and theater to disseminate information on the cycle of abuse. With personal testimonies and emotional ups and downs,  this is a show that is dedicated to keeping it real and telling the truth about domestic violence, it’s the healing journey and support needed to make it through the storm.

Nebraska’s Outlaw Trail, Highway 12

by Marci Broyhill

Cowboy poetry, story, humor and a power point presentation, provide information regarding Nebraska’s colorful characters: Doc Middleton, Kid Wade, Jesse James and vigilantes. It also highlights the positive character and influence of ranchers, Ruth and Cal Thompson, owners of the White Horse Ranch. Travel the Outlaw Trail where universal forces of good and evil; past and present often intersect

Poetry of Women on the Land

by Lucy Adkins by Marge Saiser

Women pioneers and homesteaders played an important part in the development and heritage of Nebraska. In this program, Marge Saiser and Lucy Adkins will honor them, sharing poetry they have written from the point of view of Nebraska women living from the 1890’s to the present. In addition, to provide a flavor of daily living in early Nebraska, they will feature excerpts from diaries and letters of plains women from the past.

 

Poetry from the Plains

by Twyla M. Hansen

Hansen will read selections from her poetry and discuss how the landscape of the Great Plains has inspired, influenced and shaped her writing. Her poetry follows in the footsteps of earlier Plains writers, using a sense of place to make connections between the natural and human worlds, the land and all its inhabitants–the ordinary, extraordinary food for poetry and stories about the human experience on the Plains and beyond. This presentation encourages audience questions on subjects of interest to creative writers.

Hell on Women and Horses

by Lyn Messersmith

Lyn Messersmith’s poetry mixes with historical and cultural insight to form a program that is personal as well as collective. Messersmith’s views on the landscape and loneliness, as well as the joyful and humorous events that spark ranch life, lead the audience on a journey that follows the quest of Western women for identity, spirituality and a sense of place.

Playing Around With Words: Poems, Stories, and the Creative Process

by Twyla M. Hansen

Creative writing is a process that thrives on practice. This writing workshop focuses on the creative process for both poetry and short prose. Twyla will use readings of her own and others’ writing, along with guided writing exercises, to create an interactive and supportive workshop. Through these exercises, participants will retrieve their own and others’ experiences to generate new possibilities for unique stories that might also be shaped into a poem or essay. For beginning and seasoned writers, middle school through adult.

Poetry of the African-American Cowboy

by Vicki Troxel Harris

A selection of stories from the African-American history of Nebraska have been put to rhyme as only cowboy poetry can be presented.  Harris draws from her research to share stories and poems of love, adventure, and respect, often with a bit of humor.  Those who have already heard the stories told in “African-American Homesteaders and Cowboys of Nebraska” will especially enjoy this program of history in the rhythm and romance of the range.

A Tribute to MLK

by Felicia Webster by Michelle Troxclair

Learn through original poetic works the profound effect of Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King’s sacrifice, contributions and legacy today, through the time honored artistic medium of Spoken Word. Spoken Word is part of the Great African Oral Tradition by which familial stories, history, traditions, morals and values, hopes and dreams, pain and tragedy are all relayed through cleverly woven poems and stories.

The Journey of Spoken Word

by Felicia Webster by Michelle Troxclair

The Wordsmiths present the history and nuances of Spoken Word, that part of the Great African Oral Tradition by which familial stories, history, traditions, morals and values, hopes and dreams, pain and tragedy are all relayed through cleverly woven poems and stories. It is the dramatic delivery of the soul through clever wordplay, tonal semantics, metaphor, odd syntax and characterization. It has grown, expanded and evolved. It is powerful, as words often are—when delivered with fervor, soul and spirit of African American people.

The Conversation Through Time: An Introduction to Poetry of Nebraska

by Mary K. Stillwell

When Ted Kooser was named poet laureate, we were reminded that Nebraska offers a well-stocked literary breadbasket, heaped with books of poetry, fiction and nonfiction.  Mary K. Stillwell focuses on our state’s rich heritage in song and poetry, from Pawnee times to present-day writers who continue the conversation about who we were and who we are into our time.

Bright Leaves Flying: An Introduction to U.S. Poet Laureate, Ted Kooser

by Mary K. Stillwell

Nebraska resident Ted Kooser made headlines when he was named U.S. Poet Laureate in 2004. He served from 2004-2006.  Stillwell places Kooser within the rich tradition of Nebraska poetry and provides an introduction to the poet and his work.  Kooser, born in Ames, Iowa, moved to Lincoln, Nebraska, to study with Karl Shapiro at the University of Nebraska in 1963, and has made his home in the state ever since.  Stillwell will talk about his life and how it influenced his work.  The talk can be tailored to the specific wishes of the audience.

James Whitcomb Riley, the Fiddling Children’s Poet

by Deborah Greenblatt

Using Riley’s own words, Greenblatt weaves a whimsical glimpse into the world of this famous Hoosier poet. This show, performed in character and in costume, features musical settings of Riley’s poems composed by Greenblatt, as well as portions of Riley’s lectures (he toured with Edgar Allan Poe) and letters (he corresponded with Henry Wadsworth Longfellow).