Hastings, North Platte To Host WWI Chautauqua

Hastings and North Platte will host a brand new Chautauqua based on World War I. It will be held in Hastings June 1-5 and in North Platte June 8-12. The Nebraska Chautauqua theme is “World War I: Legacies of a Forgotten War.”

“As we near the 100th anniversary of the United States’ entrance into World War I, we are inviting Nebraskans to come together and develop a fuller understanding of its lasting influences,” said Kristi Hayek Carley, HN’s Chautauqua coordinator. “Many people don’t realize how much of an effect the Great War had, both in terms of international relations and domestic issues right here in the U.S.”

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President Woodrow Wilson

Historic scholars will appear as key WWI figures to discuss how the War led to changes in America’s role in international relations, its impact on race, gender, and class issues, and how technology shaped the War. A scholar portraying President Woodrow Wilson will moderate. Evening presenters will be Nebraska politician William Jennings Bryan, humanitarian Jane Addams, author Edith Wharton, and sociologist/activist W.E.B. Du Bois.

During the five-day event, educational workshops and activities will be held during the day, and a Chautauqua youth camp will encourage middle schoolers to learn more about the local impact of the Great War on their community. Special programs of interest to veterans are in the planning stage.

In Hastings, City Councilwoman Kathy Duval and Betty Kort will serve as co-chairs. North Platte’s co-chairs are Muriel Clark, assistant director of the North Platte/Lincoln County Visitors Bureau, and Jim Griffin, executive director/curator of the Lincoln County Historical Museum.

The complete schedule of all speakers and events, as well as a reading list and more, will be available at www.NebraskaChautauqua.org and on the HN Facebook page in mid-January.


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